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but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its recent passage and fiscal affect on the federal government. this is just over an hour. it's a pleasure to be here. thanks to you at st. peter's university hospital for the opportunity to be here today. the topic today's health care reform. it's based on the book and the principal author called the battle for health care obama as reform for america's future is a nonpartisan analysis of health care reform and we are headed. i appro
the past five years. in contrast in a speech in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company it makes it harder for solar technology generally because the other entrepreneurs in the solar field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government put half a billion dollars into one of its choice. excellent question. i wrote this book because we are not just spending half a billion dollars. we are spending $12 billion a year to make electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that is $6 billion in tax breaks and $6 billion in direct expenditures. the green jobs that makes no sense and has low-income americans, we brainwash our children to think that green is good and fink uncritically about green products and green jobs and yet we can't even define what a green job is. let's start with a green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs that it has counted. namely the energy from renewable sources, e
regulation. >> what impact, if any, do you think that the changes in california and their method for electing congressional representatives will have? >> are you referring to the redistricting? >> yes. democrat versus democrat, republican versus republican in their system of electing. >> if i am understanding your right, you are referring to -- now there was a kind of bipartisan commission that redesigned -- that did the redistricting. now, i actually did a story for the atlantic monthly on redistricting. i had mentioned this thing. there has been -- the belief by many politicians is that there is no such thing as a bipartisan board are nonpartisan board. they often times point to the california commission as a failed experiment because the democrats had menace to influence a series of e-mails obtained by pro public of which suggest that was the minister and floods a lot of these. having said that there are a number of other states in the u.s. that do have bipartisan redistricting commissions. and just for what it's worth another reason why this is a salient topic is that i am often asked, if
aren't we getting together? >> that is a great idea. >> if you change california i could tell you sacramento is broke and. please but against every single tax. [applause] >> this crowd does not need to be reminded. >> the ballot is very long. vote against every single one. it's like giving her a went to a junkie. >> herald-tribune is for sale. how do we by media? >> bella also like to comment on the public-school said. liberals don't favor that but they send their kids to the white private school it does not matter to them but who is by teeing the vouchers to the and mail and al gore was asked in the debate in harlem and he was running for president as he was beholden to the teachers' unions a black reporter said if you are so big on the public schools then why do your kids go to private schools? he got angry and said don't bring my children and to this. way to. [laughter] hold on. not so fast. is great to start another fox news but why is that the only game in town? they have 10 times the ratings of cnn but it has not occurred two msnbc they are getting higher ratings of wonder i
of california in 1962. nixon remembered that. [laughter] so one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was a fellow named george romney. who's son mitt has been in the news lately. mitt's day complained that ray was not being very cooperative. he seemed to think he could run it any way saw he fit. there was talk that ray may have used fannie mae postage or letter head to raise money for the democratic candidates. and the white house was gets complaints from the republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all fannie mae work related to foreclosures. all the fees. within nine months nixon fired him as fannie mae without giving any public explanation. he resisted. he full min nate to the press that nixon was turning fannie mae in to a patronage put pudding. he tried to get a restraining order from the federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. ray kept showing up for work anyway. at one point, the lights went out and the phone lines went dead. some people interpreted this as a subtle message f
and buy the media? if you change california, blue, broken, broken, sacramento is broken. vote against every single tax, every single one. [applause] please vote against measures. >> i don't think the crowd needs to be reminded of that. [laughter] ann, the ballot is long. >> right. >> there's ten taxes there. vote against every single one. >> right. >> the last thing sacramento needs it more money. it's like giving heroin to a junky. >> i think you may need to go bankrupt. >> how do you buy media, but -- >> i'd also like to comment on your taking over the public schools and actually producing useful ones. liberals don't favor that, but liberals move heaven and earth to send their kids to private schools. that doesn't matter to them what happens in the public schools, and who is it fighting the vouchers tooth and nail. al gore was asked in a debate in harlem when he was running for president because he had been, you know, of course, the democrats that are beholding to the teachers' unions, and so a black gal reporter got up and said, now, you know, if you're big on the public schools, s
in california. that the particular time. there's a whole set of circumstance that lead her to, you know, she's from the tropics, central america, you know, how did she wind up in the desert. everybody has a story in the desert how they got there. she said, [inaudible] we'll take care of you and give you a place to live shortly there after. i arrive and one of the first things i saw when i rented my shack in the sand next to a sign that said next services 100 miles, the town of 129 presiden. i felt myself to go further out. they are at the edge of beautiful national park. you know that? right. if you haven't been there. u2 album. the joshua tree. you know what it looks like. crazy arms going this way and that. well, i wanted to go further out. there was something that was driving me further out in to the nothing. the big empty, as they say. and also because the further out you went the rent got cheaper and cheaper and cheaper. i was paying $27 5 a month for a two-bed rom house with five acres of land on the edge of 29 palms, right where the sign said next service 100 miles. that's where the b
town meetings and apples. we can of oranges in some other process in california to people can take the inspiration and use it from wherever they are to the democratic possibility rises up locally and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. >> and 73 from the historical society. if a sub for a librarian and were in the vault of history center in vermont. we've got a photo album created by george houghton, a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of burbach troops are in civil war. he presented this album to us in 1863 after he returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters that camp, but also other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that often reproduced as this one of a family of slaves again tieless. right below it is a photograph of soffa vermont officers. >> some of the other pictures showed been batteries they were using that were involved in this. there are photos here show in the aftermath at the burial ground of the soldiers. those photos get used a lot. there's a batter
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout this year. he serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has talked business, economic history and military history, he is the author of a dozen books including first, a patriot's history of the united states which he co-authored. other topics on which he is written include national defence, history, the u.s. economy. a television series based on winklevoss is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome juan williams to hear about his newest book, winklevoss which in this case will be from 1898 -- winklevoss -- a patriot's history of the modern world. >> thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it is an
next to the chevy plant in van nuys, california, and we were the loser kids, poor kids who we were supposed to go to vietnam, and if we department get kill, go work in the chevy plant. it was a uaw job, made refrigerators. my father sold them, and they took away the chevy plant, loaded it up on the railroad tracks, took it down to mexico. like they took the plant to china now. they took away our lives. they took away our jobs. i'm not going to let them take away our votes too. i thank you for giving me this opportunity to help us all steal back our votes. thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information, visit the author's webs, gregpalst.com. >> conservative scholar presents thoughts on the obama presidency and what he deems are the, quote, "fatal contradictions, end quote, of liberalism. he speaks to the audience and answers questions for about an hour. >> good evening. i'm matthew spalding, vice president of american studies here at the american foundation. we're in for a treat. here we are, approaching election, pretends ton a water shed recognized by both political par
where stanford california is and i went to berkeley to get away from stanford. i study political theory and then i was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant why was a student, robert, who at that time, he brought in and worked there for a while. i guess the rest is in history but anyway, that's a bit of early backer spent and i want to get in this comment from jill. jill tweets in, what influence do you think mr. hitchens writing had on shaping women's history in america and the world? >> i'm not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously a bloke i have a new. he was absolutely, he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote a piece for "vanity fair," why women aren't funny. at it was one more assignment and he wrote it. and if you actually read it, it doesn't actually, the article doesn't say what the title might imply. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man, and so loved by women. he was very charismatic. women adored him, but he didn't let the sexual card at all. so i don't know what, i don't know if he has a place in quote women's hi
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
communities. in vermont we have town meetings and they work incredibly well here but in california that is not a decision and their decisions people can build on. if they can say okay well, in order to be really a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberate advantage to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework to people to say, look, here is how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town meetings and apples like they do in vermont. we can have oranges are some or some other process so people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibility to rise up locally and hopefully i think in some ways i can have an impact on the national conversation.
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16